Last month, as rebels supported by Rwanda advanced on Goma, the capital of mineral-rich North Kivu in the eastern Democratic Republic of Congo, Richard Mosse was there to photograph the conflict. He has been documenting what he calls the “Hobbesian state of war” in the region on and off for two years using infrared film, which, because it was originally developed for military purposes, Mosse says is “the appropriate medium.” Foliage reflects infrared light and camouflage absorbs it, so infrared-sensitive film can reveal camouflaged troops and buildings, as well as produce the pink tints in these pictures. In this way, Mosse highlights the eastern Congo’s natural bounty while acknowledging both the medium’s origins and, he points out, the West’s tendency to see in the Congo only darkness and insanity.
- Photos by Richard Mosse, via Willy Staley of the New York Times

Last month, as rebels supported by Rwanda advanced on Goma, the capital of mineral-rich North Kivu in the eastern Democratic Republic of Congo, Richard Mosse was there to photograph the conflict. He has been documenting what he calls the “Hobbesian state of war” in the region on and off for two years using infrared film, which, because it was originally developed for military purposes, Mosse says is “the appropriate medium.” Foliage reflects infrared light and camouflage absorbs it, so infrared-sensitive film can reveal camouflaged troops and buildings, as well as produce the pink tints in these pictures. In this way, Mosse highlights the eastern Congo’s natural bounty while acknowledging both the medium’s origins and, he points out, the West’s tendency to see in the Congo only darkness and insanity.

- Photos by Richard Mosse, via Willy Staley of the New York Times